Friday, 30 December 2016

What to Know About Gingivitis

What Is Gingivitis?
Gingivitis is an early stage of gum disease caused by the buildup of plaque bacteria on the tissues that surround the teeth. Plaque, a naturally occurring biofilm containing bacteria, can lead to gingivitis if not removed by daily brushing. 

Who Can Get Gingivitis?
Gingivitis is quite prevalent. But while almost 80% of adults will experience some symptoms of gingivitis, that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s inevitable. It’s important to note that occasionally there might be no noticeable pain or apparent signs, leaving people unaware that they have it. That’s another good reason to schedule regular checkups with your dental professional every six months so he or she can identify it and suggest treatment options.

Gingivitis Symptoms
Some symptoms of gingivitis include red, swollen, and bleeding gums. Chronic gingivitis can lead to periodontitis and chronic bad breath. If these symptoms persist, it's important to talk with your dental professional to determine the best treatment. In the meantime, learn what you can do to protect against gingivitis.

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Dental Plaque

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental plaque.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Friday, 23 December 2016

Parts of the Tooth

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about about what makes up the tooth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Monday, 12 December 2016

6 Tips for Cavity-Free Holidays - continued

#5: Watch out for starchy foods 
These are sneaky because they often get trapped in your teeth. If you choose to indulge in chips and cakes, take extra care when you floss that day to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque build-up. 

#6: You can still have fun 
So, what can you eat? Lots of stuff! Make lean protein choices, such as lean beef, skinless poultry and fish and vary your diet. Eat whole grains and choose low-fat or fat-free dairy foods. The holidays are a great time of year to start thinking about healthier habits. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice-such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, and vegetables-for your overall health and the health of your teeth.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Dental Visits are Important

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about the importance in visiting the dentist.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Monday, 5 December 2016

6 Tips for Cavity-Free Holidays - continued

#3: Limit your alcohol intake 
’Tis the season for egg nog, Brandy Alexanders and glog! If you choose to imbibe, try to drink water alongside your drinks. And remember: Too much alcohol can dry out your mouth. 

#4: Take it easy on the hard candies 
Some candies are more problematic than others. Hard candies can put your teeth at risk because in addition to being full of sugar, they’ve also been known to cause broken or chipped teeth. (Be careful not to break or chip your teeth when eating nuts as well!) 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Mouth Healthy Moments: How to Floss

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about flossing your teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Monday, 28 November 2016

6 Tips for Cavity-Free Holidays

#1: Timing matters 
Timing matters. While everything is fine in moderation, it helps to eat sweets and other sugary foods with meals or shortly after mealtime. Saliva production increases during meals and helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and helps rinse away food particles.  

#2: Be picky if it's sticky
When it comes to picking healthy snacks, many people put dried fruit at the top of the list. But many dried fruits are sticky and sticky foods tend to stay on the teeth longer than other types of food. If you find yourself eating a lot of dried fruits such as cranberries, make sure to rinse with water and brush carefully. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Mouth Healthy Moments: How to Brush Your Teeth

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about brushing your teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Saturday, 12 November 2016

Manual Tooth Brushing and Flossing Technique

An effective oral hygiene routine starts with a few simple steps:

A Proper Brushing Technique for your Teeth 
A proper brushing technique is the first step to maintaining healthy teeth and gums. Plus, it helps minimize the risk of tooth decay and gum disease, the major causes of tooth loss.

Before You Begin 
While there are several tooth brushing techniques with a manual toothbrush, always ask your dental professional for their recommendation and be sure to follow their instructions. To start, use fluoride toothpaste with a soft-bristle toothbrush, and don't forget to replace it every three months.

Two Minutes, Twice a Day 
To brush your teeth correctly, spend at least two minutes using a recommended brushing technique, which includes 30 seconds brushing each section of your mouth (upper right, upper left, lower right and lower left), both morning and night. Since most manual toothbrushes don't have built-in two-minute timers, you may want to have a clock handy so you can be sure you're brushing long enough.

Positioning the Toothbrush 
How you hold the toothbrush depends on which part of the tooth you're brushing.

Please read the entire article, found at DentalCare.com, to see more detailed information on manual brushing and flossing.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Sunday, 6 November 2016

Sugarless Gum

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about sugarless gum.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Saturday, 5 November 2016

How to Brush with an Electric Toothbrush - Dental Care

You can achieve better plaque removal and gingivitis reduction with an electric toothbrush that utilizes oscillating-rotating technology than with a regular manual toothbrush.

This brushing action is very different from ordinary manual toothbrushes, as it does the job of brushing for you. Be sure to guide the brush head to all parts of your mouth.

Rotating Electric Toothbrush Instructions

Hold the brush parallel to the floor, against the side of your teeth.










Guide the brush head slowly from tooth to tooth, following the curve of the teeth and gums.
It isn't necessary to press hard or scrub. Simply let the electric toothbrush do all the work.
Hold the brush head in place for a few seconds before moving on to the next tooth.

Please read the entire article, found at DentalCare.com, to see more detailed information on how to use an electric toothbrush.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Sunday, 30 October 2016

Girl's Sports Mouth Injuries

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about mouth injuries due to sports.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Saturday, 29 October 2016

Dental Hygiene for Kids

Your child’s well-being is your biggest concern and their oral hygiene is an important part of their overall health. The care of your child’s teeth and gums begins with you - - you can set them on the right path for a lifetime of excellent oral hygiene.

Oral Hygiene for Infants
Babies are born with all their teeth - you can't see them because they are hidden in the gums. Baby teeth start to break through the gums around 6 months but it is important to start good oral care for infants even before the first tooth comes in. From healthy gums come healthy teeth.

  • Wipe your baby’s gums with a soft washcloth after feeding. This helps remove the bacteria that can cause tooth decay.
  • Once they begin to erupt, brush teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear the size of a grain of rice - use a soft-bristle toothbrush.

Please read the entire article, found at DentalCare.com, to see more detailed information on dental hygiene for children.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Sunday, 23 October 2016

Tooth Bonding

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about tooth bonding.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Sunday, 9 October 2016

Five Surprising Reasons for Bad Breath in Children

Having your kids brush their teeth before they go to bed each night helps them learn good oral hygiene practices. And while twice-daily toothbrushing is good for developing teeth, it always enough to stop bad breath from occurring. Bad breath isn't always solely an oral health issue, there can be other causes that need a different solution. Here are five surprising causes of bad breath in children and how to stop them.
Sinus Infection
Have any of your kids complained about a sore throat or stuffy nose lately? It might be a sinus infection. Sinus issues cause fluid to collect in the nasal passages and throat, making your child's throat the perfect place for bacteria to gather. The result? Stinky breath that can't be cured with toothbrushing and mouthwash alone. If you suspect a sinus infection (potential sore throat, burning nasal passages and post nasal drip), call your doctor for a visit and see if antibiotics will be prescribed.
Foreign Objects
It may not be your first thought, but your child's bad breath could be the result of something stuck in her nasal passages. Kids are curious, and their nostrils are just the right size for inserting small items such as beads, beans, toy accessories and food. Pediatrician Dr. William Sears explains that when an object gets lodged in a child's nasal passages it can create a nasty smell. If you suspect this is what is causing your child's bad breath, you'll need a doctor to help check your child's nasal passages and remove the object.

To read the entire article written by Jae Curtis , please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Friday, 7 October 2016

Sunday, 2 October 2016

Dental Caries: How They Are Formed and What You Can Do to Prevent Them

Dental caries (cavities) are the most common form of oral disease known to man, and the process of getting caries is called tooth decay.
Tooth decay is the destruction of your tooth enamel -- the hard, outer layer of your teeth. This issue can affect children, teens and adults. Plaque, a sticky film of bacteria, is constantly forming on your teeth. When you eat or drink foods or beverages containing sugars, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack tooth enamel. The stickiness of the plaque keeps these acids in contact with your teeth, and over time the enamel can break down, according to the American Dental Association (ADA).

The types of caries formed can be broken down into two major groups:

Pit and fissure caries. These are found most often on the chewing surfaces of the back (molar and premolar) teeth, and the back of the front (anterior) teeth. Your teeth are composed of several sections of enamel, and where these sections meet, pits and grooves can trap plaque, causing decay. The proper application of pit and fissure sealants, a hard plastic material applied to seal the grooves and pits when the teeth have erupted, can prevent this type of dental caries. The sealants also make it less likely that you will need restorations (fillings) on those surfaces of the teeth.

Smooth surface caries. These are found most often along the gumline or where two teeth touch (interproximal or the space between teeth), if plaque forms in those areas. With the proper use of dental floss, you can prevent most smooth surface caries in the interproximal area, and using a manual or power toothbrush along the gumline can prevent caries in that area as well.

To read the entire article written by Richard A Huot, DDS, please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Friday, 30 September 2016

Sunday, 25 September 2016

What is Dry Mouth?

What is Dry Mouth?
Dry mouth means you don't have enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth moist. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while, especially if you're nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to more serious health problems or indicate that a more serious medical condition may exist. That's because saliva does more than just keep the mouth wet -it helps digest food, protects teeth from decay, prevents infection by controlling bacteria in the mouth, and makes it possible for you to chew and swallow.

There are several reasons that the glands that produce saliva, called the salivary glands, might not function properly. These include:

  • Side effects of some medications - over 400 medicines can cause dry mouth, including antihistamines, decongestants, pain killers, diuretics and medicines for high blood pressure and depression.
  • Disease - diseases that affect the salivary glands, such as diabetes, Hodgkin's, Parkinson's disease, HIV/AIDS and Sjogren's syndrome, may lead to dry mouth.
  • Radiation therapy - the salivary glands can be damaged if your head or neck are exposed to radiation during cancer treatment. The loss of saliva can be total or partial, permanent or temporary.
  • Chemotherapy - drugs used to treat cancer can make saliva thicker, or "ropey," causing your mouth to feel dry.
  • Menopause - changing hormone levels affect the salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and post-menopausal women with a persistent feeling of dry mouth.
  • Smoking - many pipe, cigar and heavy cigarette smokers experience dry mouth.

To read the entire article , please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Friday, 23 September 2016

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Dental Veneers: Pros and Cons

Dental veneers are thin pieces of tooth-colored porcelain cemented to the front surfaces of your natural teeth, and are an easy way to address a variety of physical and aesthetic problems. Because they're also permanent, however, you'll need to carefully weigh the pros and cons of the procedure before you decide to get them. Here are six things to think about and discuss with your dentist.

Pro #1: Easily Whiten Your Smile
Years of drinking coffee, smoking cigarettes or eating highly pigmented foods eventually take their toll on your teeth, turning them an unattractive shade of yellow or brown. Stained enamel can be bleached at home or by your dentist, but it can become stained again. If you're looking for an easier way to whiten your smile for good, dental veneers may be a good fit for you. Veneers are largely stain-resistant, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), so you won't have to worry about discoloration or needing to have your veneers whitened.

To read the entire article written by Jennifer Mitchell , please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Tuesday, 6 September 2016

Crowns

A crown is a tooth-shaped cover placed over a tooth that is badly damaged or decayed. Many people call it a cap.
Crowns may be placed for several reasons. Usually the tooth has been broken or severely damaged by decay. As a result, a filling can't replace enough of the tooth or make the tooth strong enough. A crown may hold together parts of a cracked tooth. It also can be used to hold a bridge in place. Crowns can be used to improve appearance as well. They may be placed to cover misshapen or badly discolored teeth.

Crowns can be made ahead of time (prefabricated) or made to order in a laboratory. Prefabricated crowns are made of plastic or stainless steel. They can be used on a temporary basis until a permanent crown is made.

Crowns can be made of:

  • All metal
  • Zirconia
  • Porcelain fused to metal (PFM)
  • Porcelain fused to zirconia
  • All ceramic

Metals include gold alloy, other alloys (palladium) or a base-metal alloy (nickel or chromium). The all-metal or PFM crowns are stronger and are better choices for back teeth than ceramic crowns. PFM and all-ceramic crowns are the same color as your natural teeth. They look just like normal teeth.

To read the entire article , please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Diet & Your Teeth

Learn more about the connection between your teeth and what you eat.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Tuesday, 30 August 2016

Discolored Teeth: Five Foods that Cause Stains

Proper oral hygiene is of course indispensable for maintaining a bright smile, but there is one other important bit of advice: Watch what you eat and drink. Certain foods and beverages can discolor teeth. If you want to protect your pearly whites, read on for some common culprits that stain your teeth.

Pasta Sauce
Because of their acidity, bright red hue and tendency to cling to the teeth, the tomatoes in pasta sauce can leave your teeth vulnerable to staining. Dine on some dark green veggies, such as broccoli, kale and spinach, beforehand to create a protective film over the teeth. The film will ward off tomatoes' staining effect, so spring for a green salad as an appetizer.

Curry
Curry, a spice that works well in Indian food and exotic dishes, is also a cause of discolored teeth. Its deep pigmentation can yellow teeth over time. Due to its high staining factor, curry is something you may want to limit in your diet. Whenever you dine on curry-spiced food, mix in fresh fruits and vegetables that prevent stains, such as apples, carrots, cauliflower and celery.

To read the entire article written by Margie Monin Dombrowski , please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Lifestyle & Your Oral Health

Learn more about how your lifestyle can affect your oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.


Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Tuesday, 23 August 2016

Saturday, 13 August 2016

Oral Cancer

In Canada, 3400 new cases of mouth cancer are diagnosed each year. About 50% of those diagnosed do not live longer than 5 years after diagnosis because it wasn’t detected early enough.
The most common sites for oral cancer to be found are the tongue (which has the highest prevalence), throat, floor of the mouth and lips. Regular tobacco use (both chewing and smoking), alcohol consumption and prolonged sun exposure all increase risk in addition to age.

To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Saturday, 6 August 2016

Gingivitis

When teeth are not properly cleaned, plaque forms on the tooth’s surface. Plaque can cause irritation of the gums, making them red and slightly swollen - this is gingivitis. More serious forms of gum disease such as periodontitis start with gingivitis.
Signs & Symptoms:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums that bleed when brushed or flossed
  • Bad breath
Good management of gingivitis is a sign of good oral hygiene. This helps prevent halitosis, bleeding gums and other more serious dental diseases. Remember, there is a link between oral health and overall health.

To read the entire article , please visit plus.HealthyTeeth.org

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Learn more about the importance of saliva.

Learn more about the importance of saliva.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com