Sunday, 30 October 2016

Girl's Sports Mouth Injuries

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about mouth injuries due to sports.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Saturday, 29 October 2016

Dental Hygiene for Kids

Your child’s well-being is your biggest concern and their oral hygiene is an important part of their overall health. The care of your child’s teeth and gums begins with you - - you can set them on the right path for a lifetime of excellent oral hygiene.

Oral Hygiene for Infants
Babies are born with all their teeth - you can't see them because they are hidden in the gums. Baby teeth start to break through the gums around 6 months but it is important to start good oral care for infants even before the first tooth comes in. From healthy gums come healthy teeth.

  • Wipe your baby’s gums with a soft washcloth after feeding. This helps remove the bacteria that can cause tooth decay.
  • Once they begin to erupt, brush teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear the size of a grain of rice - use a soft-bristle toothbrush.

Please read the entire article, found at DentalCare.com, to see more detailed information on dental hygiene for children.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Sunday, 23 October 2016

Tooth Bonding

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about tooth bonding.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Sunday, 9 October 2016

Five Surprising Reasons for Bad Breath in Children

Having your kids brush their teeth before they go to bed each night helps them learn good oral hygiene practices. And while twice-daily toothbrushing is good for developing teeth, it always enough to stop bad breath from occurring. Bad breath isn't always solely an oral health issue, there can be other causes that need a different solution. Here are five surprising causes of bad breath in children and how to stop them.
Sinus Infection
Have any of your kids complained about a sore throat or stuffy nose lately? It might be a sinus infection. Sinus issues cause fluid to collect in the nasal passages and throat, making your child's throat the perfect place for bacteria to gather. The result? Stinky breath that can't be cured with toothbrushing and mouthwash alone. If you suspect a sinus infection (potential sore throat, burning nasal passages and post nasal drip), call your doctor for a visit and see if antibiotics will be prescribed.
Foreign Objects
It may not be your first thought, but your child's bad breath could be the result of something stuck in her nasal passages. Kids are curious, and their nostrils are just the right size for inserting small items such as beads, beans, toy accessories and food. Pediatrician Dr. William Sears explains that when an object gets lodged in a child's nasal passages it can create a nasty smell. If you suspect this is what is causing your child's bad breath, you'll need a doctor to help check your child's nasal passages and remove the object.

To read the entire article written by Jae Curtis , please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com

Friday, 7 October 2016

Sunday, 2 October 2016

Dental Caries: How They Are Formed and What You Can Do to Prevent Them

Dental caries (cavities) are the most common form of oral disease known to man, and the process of getting caries is called tooth decay.
Tooth decay is the destruction of your tooth enamel -- the hard, outer layer of your teeth. This issue can affect children, teens and adults. Plaque, a sticky film of bacteria, is constantly forming on your teeth. When you eat or drink foods or beverages containing sugars, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack tooth enamel. The stickiness of the plaque keeps these acids in contact with your teeth, and over time the enamel can break down, according to the American Dental Association (ADA).

The types of caries formed can be broken down into two major groups:

Pit and fissure caries. These are found most often on the chewing surfaces of the back (molar and premolar) teeth, and the back of the front (anterior) teeth. Your teeth are composed of several sections of enamel, and where these sections meet, pits and grooves can trap plaque, causing decay. The proper application of pit and fissure sealants, a hard plastic material applied to seal the grooves and pits when the teeth have erupted, can prevent this type of dental caries. The sealants also make it less likely that you will need restorations (fillings) on those surfaces of the teeth.

Smooth surface caries. These are found most often along the gumline or where two teeth touch (interproximal or the space between teeth), if plaque forms in those areas. With the proper use of dental floss, you can prevent most smooth surface caries in the interproximal area, and using a manual or power toothbrush along the gumline can prevent caries in that area as well.

To read the entire article written by Richard A Huot, DDS, please visit Colgate.com

Suncook Dental   
Charles Albee, DMD   
Andrew Albee, DMD   
119 Pembroke Street   
Suncook, NH 03275   
(603) 485-2273     
SuncookDental.com